Right + Sacrifice = Victory

“For when people get caught up with that which is right and they are willing to sacrifice for it, there is no stopping point short of victory.”

Martin Luther King, Jr.

This quote really raises a number of questions that I want to think through. What exactly is “right?” What is it that you are willing to sacrifice for? Is it your principles? Perhaps your values? Maybe its family? Just how far are you willing to go achieve victory?

It seems clear to me that once you know the answers to these questions and have a well defined definition of what victory is, you have by design said that there is no stopping point. Do you have that clear vision of what is right in your mind? Without that how will you ever keep going when the challenges inevitably raise up? How can you ever muscle through if you don’t have a clearly defined “right?”

It doesn’t have to be something that changes the world the way that Dr. King’s did, it can be enough to simply change your world, and the world of those that love you…

I was wrong…

“Confidence comes not from always being right but not fearing to be wrong.”

Unknown

There is such a distinct difference between a person who is always right (ego) and a person that isn’t afraid to be wrong (confident AND humble). I have worked with both and the leadership impact of the latter on those around them is incredible.

The leader who doesn’t HAVE to be right, but cares first and foremost about doing what is right builds a powerful team of thinkers and a culture of openness and candor.

The leader who is always right builds a team of people that are aggressively waiting to be told what to do. Smart people won’t stay in this kind of culture because it is demoralizing and limits the capabilities of the entire organization.

Don’t fear being wrong, embrace it, it sends a powerful lesson to those that you lead and serve.

Kindness over rightness…

“If you have a choice between being right and being kind, choose kind.”

Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

How much energy is spent in the world on “being right” versus doing “what is right.” This applies to personal relationships, work relationships, corporate relationships, etc. The minute one’s ego is allowed to be in the drivers seat being right will have a higher priority over doing what is right. The problem is that it creates a vicious cycle where a response or retaliation is the first instinct. When this happens how do you stop the cycle? How do you take the ego out of the drivers seat and return the focus to what is truly important?

In the book of Matthew Jesus laid out how to do this, and it is some incredibly difficult advice to follow. However, when you can pause long enough to remove emotion from the situation you can see how applying this would solve so much in our world.

“But I say to you, Do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. “You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you.” Matthew 5:38-42

Human nature puts the ego in control, puts being right first, puts self over kindness. When you read this passage I love how it mirrors the wisdom in today’s quote and shifts the focus from the desire of being right to demonstrating kindness and generosity. Easy to say, hard to do. How can you choose kindness today?

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